#oregondesert

posts and images

Romance springs from the heart of the American truck. #chevy #silverado3500 #oregondesert #bendoregon #sunset

Romance springs from the heart of the American truck.  #chevy  #silverado3500  #oregondesert  #bendoregon  #sunset

Springs ~ camping ~ sunrise ~ breakfast. ☀️A few oldies from our first trip out to the Alvord desert. .
.
.
#alvorddesert #alvordhotsprings #oregondesert #highdesert #easternoregon

Springs ~ camping ~ sunrise ~ breakfast. ☀️A few oldies from our first trip out to the Alvord desert. . . .  #alvorddesert  #alvordhotsprings  #oregondesert  #highdesert  #easternoregon

Yeah, flowers are cool. But this is where I’m most happy 🏜 .
.
.
#oregondesert #highdesert #summerlakehotsprings #summerlakeoregon #centraloregon #exploregon

Yeah, flowers are cool. But this is where I’m most happy 🏜 . . .  #oregondesert  #highdesert  #summerlakehotsprings  #summerlakeoregon  #centraloregon  #exploregon

On an truck launch for the new Chevy Silverado, but you onow I still have a professional interest in coffee. #espresso #cappuccino #oregondesert

On an truck launch for the new Chevy Silverado, but you onow I still have a professional interest in coffee.  #espresso  #cappuccino  #oregondesert

My 31st birthday started with a beautiful sunrise and one of my favorite views #bestmorning  #theproperty #highlandacres #highdesert #oregrown #oregondesert #juniper #strawberrymountains #purplemountainsmajesty

My 31st birthday started with a beautiful sunrise and one of my favorite views  #bestmorning  #theproperty  #highlandacres  #highdesert  #oregrown  #oregondesert  #juniper  #strawberrymountains  #purplemountainsmajesty

ODT Day 27: Mile 382.7 to 399.4
Snow flew sideways in the wind as I hiked out of South Steens Campground wearing everything layer of clothing I had. To avoid a steep snow climb, I decided to hike up the closed road into the mountains instead of the trail through the valley. The road cut up onto the ridge in a series of switchbacks, and a couple hours later I was 2,000 feet higher and in the heart of a snowstorm. I could see the thick snow up ahead covering the road, and knew I had another ten miles of going up in elevation, with no cover from the storm. I thought about setting up my shelter to wait it out, but there was no water up here and I had only a liter left. After taking a long snack break and agonizing over my maps, I knew I had to bail. 
I descended quickly back to the campground, and began the twenty mile road walk towards the highway. A car passed me and asked about the campground, and I told them it was just ahead and asked if I could pay them for a lift to the junction. They declined politely and drove off, but half an hour later, the same car came up, and the woman inside told me to get in. She and her son were out for the weekend to go hiking, and she had convinced him to go back for me once they realized the chances of me getting a lift on this road were slim to none. I thanked them profusely as they gave me bananas and chatted about hikng. 
Two hours and another hitch later and I was at Fields Station in the desert flats, eating French fries and laying my gear out to dry on the patio. Tourists streamed in and out of the store, peppering me with curious questions. Once my gear was dry and I was full of grease and salt I set off down the highway, weaving up the Pueblo foothills in the blistering heat. I could see the Steens behind me, a dark cloud hanging low to the white capped peaks. I'll be back for you, don't you worry. .
Location: traditional homelands of the Paiute.

ODT Day 27: Mile 382.7 to 399.4 Snow flew sideways in the wind as I hiked out of South Steens Campground wearing everything layer of clothing I had. To avoid a steep snow climb, I decided to hike up the closed road into the mountains instead of the trail through the valley. The road cut up onto the ridge in a series of switchbacks, and a couple hours later I was 2,000 feet higher and in the heart of a snowstorm. I could see the thick snow up ahead covering the road, and knew I had another ten miles of going up in elevation, with no cover from the storm. I thought about setting up my shelter to wait it out, but there was no water up here and I had only a liter left. After taking a long snack break and agonizing over my maps, I knew I had to bail. I descended quickly back to the campground, and began the twenty mile road walk towards the highway. A car passed me and asked about the campground, and I told them it was just ahead and asked if I could pay them for a lift to the junction. They declined politely and drove off, but half an hour later, the same car came up, and the woman inside told me to get in. She and her son were out for the weekend to go hiking, and she had convinced him to go back for me once they realized the chances of me getting a lift on this road were slim to none. I thanked them profusely as they gave me bananas and chatted about hikng. Two hours and another hitch later and I was at Fields Station in the desert flats, eating French fries and laying my gear out to dry on the patio. Tourists streamed in and out of the store, peppering me with curious questions. Once my gear was dry and I was full of grease and salt I set off down the highway, weaving up the Pueblo foothills in the blistering heat. I could see the Steens behind me, a dark cloud hanging low to the white capped peaks. I'll be back for you, don't you worry. . Location: traditional homelands of the Paiute.

ODT Day 26: Mile 364.9 to 382.7
My mom and her friend Victoria dropped me off at the Page Springs Campground mid morning, mosquitoes buzzing around as I hugged them goodbye and set off down the two-track.
It was overcast and chilly as I followed an overgrown dirt road up into the foothills and towards the base of the mountains. I crossed Blitzen Creek just before noon, the water up to my chest and the current so strong I could barely take a step, my trekking poles vibrating madly. 
I ran into a couple of backpackers in the afternoon, to our collective surprise. They were at the end of their first backpacking trip and told me about racing river crossings and deep snow drifts that waited ahead, and we chatted for a minute before hiking on. 
In the early evening I reached the second crossing of Blitzen Creek, and the water rushed deep and fast. I walked along the banks, finally finding a spot with thick overhanging branches to guide my way across. Holding onto the tree trunk, I carefully lowered myself into the swirling water. It was only up to my collarbone, but I knew instantly this was the swiftest river I'd ever crossed. I clung to the branches, slowly inching my way across. "Just stay on your feet," I chanted to myself in the freezing water, finally reaching the other side and crawling onto the grassy bank, adrenaline rushing through me. .
Location: traditional homelands of the Paiute.

ODT Day 26: Mile 364.9 to 382.7 My mom and her friend Victoria dropped me off at the Page Springs Campground mid morning, mosquitoes buzzing around as I hugged them goodbye and set off down the two-track. It was overcast and chilly as I followed an overgrown dirt road up into the foothills and towards the base of the mountains. I crossed Blitzen Creek just before noon, the water up to my chest and the current so strong I could barely take a step, my trekking poles vibrating madly. I ran into a couple of backpackers in the afternoon, to our collective surprise. They were at the end of their first backpacking trip and told me about racing river crossings and deep snow drifts that waited ahead, and we chatted for a minute before hiking on. In the early evening I reached the second crossing of Blitzen Creek, and the water rushed deep and fast. I walked along the banks, finally finding a spot with thick overhanging branches to guide my way across. Holding onto the tree trunk, I carefully lowered myself into the swirling water. It was only up to my collarbone, but I knew instantly this was the swiftest river I'd ever crossed. I clung to the branches, slowly inching my way across. "Just stay on your feet," I chanted to myself in the freezing water, finally reaching the other side and crawling onto the grassy bank, adrenaline rushing through me. . Location: traditional homelands of the Paiute.

©Insgain | Best Instagram online viewer
This site uses the Instagram API but is not endorsed or certified by Instagram. All Instagram™ logos and trademarks displayed on this applicatioin are property of Instagram.